Hidden Details We’ve Never Noticed In Monster Movies


Act natural

Our favorite monster movies are jam-packed with easter eggs, inside jokes, and some amazing continuity between several films that all reference each other. Here are some of our favorite hidden details and easter eggs hidden in the many monster movies that most people probably missed the first time around – but they definitely make the movie watching experience so much better, and make us appreciate them so much more.

Act natural

We know that Hollywood actors like doing their own stunts, but this takes it to a whole new level. If you stick around to the credits of Godzilla: King of the Monsters, you’ll notice that all four monsters appearing in the film, Godzilla, Rodan, Mothra, and King Ghidorah all get credited as themselves.

Act natural

Good to know that they also have defined pronouns, because we wouldn’t want to be on the wrong side when we refer to they/them monsters by he/him pronoun.

The atomic breath

One of Godzilla’s most notorious powers is his infamous Atomic Breath, and the filmmakers behind the new Godzilla movies found a nice way to explain the anatomy of how it works.

The atomic breath

In the films, we can see Godzilla chagrin up his Atomic breath through his dorsal fins on his back, and they heat up until the energy blasts out of his mouth. The sound that they make as they charge is actually a version of King Kong’s dying heartbeat from the 1976 movie.

Please quiet down

It’s the small attention to details that enrich the world of a film, and A Quiet Place (2018) builds its dystopian world masterfully. In the opening of the film, as the family goes to stock up in the grocery store, we can see that the store’s shelves are almost all empty.

Please quiet down

Except for the snack aisle. The chip bags are all still there, since opening them will make a lot of noise, risking a monster attack.

A good company

This is the rare case of a double reference, we don’t see them often, but when we do we know that we’re in for a treat. So, in Scorsese’s 1976 masterpiece “Taxi Driver” Travis Bickle, played by Robert De Niro, wears a ‘King Kong Company’ Patch on his jacket.

A good company

This gets referenced in 2017’s Kong: Skull Island, when Marlow, played by John C. Riley, can be seen wearing a similar patch with “Lizard Company” on his jacket.

Tighty Walter Whities

We all know and love Bryan Cranston, some of us from Malcolm in the Middle, but to most of us, he will forever be The One Who Knocks, Walter White.

Tighty Walter Whities

His infamous Breaking Bad character gets referenced during the opening credits of 2014’s Godzilla when redacted statements as part of the credit’s design spell out Walter White over Bryan Cranston’s name. It is a bit on the nose, but it’s still pretty cool, and pretty sneaky too.

Big Ax time

There is a lot of monster fighting going on in Godzilla Vs. Kong, so we can understand how some details slipped under all of the chaos, but this fight detail is pretty cool. In the film’s final battle in Hong Kong, King Kong can be seen shoving his ax down Godzilla’s though.

Big Ax time

This is a direct reference to the 1962 King Kong vs Godzilla movie, in which King Kong shoves a tree into Godzilla’s mouth.

Consistent fighting style

While the various King Kong movies are all very different from each other and offer various takes on the character, some things remain similar across all of them. For example in the 1933 original, King Kong breaks a dinosaur’s jaw and kills it.

Consistent fighting style

He does the same thing in Peter Jackson’s 2005 remake. In 2017’s Kong: Skull Island, this doesn’t work out the same way, as Kong attempts to take on the dinosaur, but doesn’t manage to break his jaw in the same way he previously did.

Just a prank, bro

Sometimes, improvised scenes can become the most iconic movie moments, thanks to their genuine reactions. That’s the case with the Knife Trick scene in Aliens (1986).

Just a prank, bro

Originally, the scene was supposed to be Bishop performing the trick on himself, but the Bishop’s actor Lance Henrickson suggested having Bill Paxton’s hand over his. James Cameron loved the idea, and everyone but Paxton was told what was going to happen. Paxton’s reaction and fear in the scene are completely genuine.

Hold on to your what now?

One of the most iconic lines from the most iconic actors came from a role that not many people remember him in. We all know and love Sam Jackson, but his role as “what’s his name, from Jurassic Park” isn’t his most memorable, except for the iconic line: “Hold on to your butts”.

Hold on to your what now?

This gets referenced in Kong: Skull Island, when Jackson’s character, right before flying into a storm, says: “and lastly – hold on to your butts”

Valhalla I’m coming

We know how cool the Vikings were, and how they just seem to be way ahead of their time in terms of exploring the world, and it turns out that they might have found Godzilla before all of us.

Valhalla I’m coming

In Godzilla: King of the Monsters (2019) a Viking ship can be seen among the ruins in the underwater city, implying that the Vikings have discovered it hundreds of years prior. Not very surprising, to be honest.

All of the monsters

Cabin in the Woods is just great. It plays around with monster movie tropes, and we just love it so much. Well, this whiteboard in the movie basically contains all of the references of all time, to basically everything that happens in the movie.

All of the monsters

So we won’t even bother detailing what we see here, so just dig in and read all of the references to classic monsters on the board. And if you haven’t seen the movie – do so now.[

sc name=’default_lower_ad’]

Classical art references

Pan’s Labyrinth, Guillermo Del Toro’s 2006 masterpiece, deconstructs the fairytale structure in a brilliant way. The film is very heavy on symbolism that emphasizes its points and during the ‘Pale Man’ sequence, we get one of the best examples of it.

Classical art references

In the scene, the Pale Man catches and eats the Faun’s fairies. The composition mirrors the classic Goya painting “Saturn Devouring His Son”, in which the Titan Kronus eats the Greek Gods, according to Greek Mythology.

The best ad-lib

‘You’re gonna need a bigger boat’ quickly made its way into the pop-cultural pantheon as one of the most iconic movie quotes of all time – but did you know that it was improvised?

The best ad-lib

During the production of Jaws, ‘You’re gonna need a bigger boat’ was a catchphrase said by the crew every time something went wrong. Roy Schnieder improvised the line during the shot, and it worked so well that Spielberg kept it. Good choice.

Finding Nessy

We know that the Loch Ness Monster is too good to not be fake, and turns out that the famous Nessy is quite real in Godzilla’s universe (which doesn’t surprise us at all). In 2019’s Godzilla: King of the Monsters, we get a look at all of the Titans that have been discovered.

Finding Nessy

If you look closely, you can see that a Titan has been discovered in a certain lake in Scotland. We wonder who that could possibly be.

Matching Sticker

Pacific Rim put a bunch of attention into the designs of the Jaegers, and the symbols on them. Gipsy Danger had a pin-up girl decal on its right breastplate, invoking World War 2 era fighter aircraft, that had beautiful girls painted in provocative fashion on them.

Matching Sticker

These planes were powered by the De Havilland Gipsy engine, which was the Jaeger’s namesake. we can see the same decal was sewn onto the pilot jackets of Raleigh and Yancy Becket.

Remaking the classic

Peter Jackson’s King Kong was not only a remake of the 1933 original, but it also found a pretty cool way to pay tribute to it. The film takes pulsar in 1933, the same year that the original film was released, and it incorporates a reference to the original production in the movie.

Remaking the classic

In the film, Jack Black’s dialogue as he’s trying to put together a team for a movie’s production is a direct reference to the production team behind the original King Kong.

Good at dying

Bill Paxton has got to be one of our favorite 80s actors, and it turns out that he holds a high honor that only he has ever achieved. Turns out that Paxton is the only person to ever be killed by all three of the classic 80s action movie baddies.

Good at dying

He was killed by a Terminator in The Terminator, he was killed by a Xenomorph in Aliens, and he was killed by a Predator in Predator 2.

Updating the design

The design of Godzilla changed quite a lot over the years, with every remake trying to look more modern. That’s what the 2014 Godzilla remake did.

Updating the design

But when it came time for the sequel, Godzilla: King of the Monsters in 2019, the filmmakers decided to tinker with the design a bit, and honor some of the original designs. In the film, Godzilla’s back spikes were changed to look more like the original film’s, and Godzilla’s first appearance.

Creating the iconic sound

One of the most iconic things we all know about the Predator today is that chilling clicking sound he makes. Well, turns out it was all a happy accident. Actor Peter Cullen had just finished working on another project and had a sore throat.

Creating the iconic sound

So he chose the easiest vocalization he could think of – the clicking sound. He later said that this sound reminded him of a dying crab, which the Predator resembled in his eyes.

Why they had fireworks

Paying attention to the small details in A Quiet Place can explain why the family ever had fireworks, to begin with. On the 473rd day of the invasion, we can see that the date is October 3rd, which means that the first day of the invasion was June 17, two weeks before the 4th of July.

Why they had fireworks

This can explain why they had fireworks on hand a year later. They were stoking up for the holiday but never used them.

Planting clues

We love finding hidden clues in movies, that hint at the larger universe at large. Before Mothra made its grand debut in Godzilla: King of the Monsters, it’s referenced in the first Godzilla film.

Planting clues

In the movie, when Ford and his father return to the quarantine zone, we can see a tank with Ford’s childhood moth in it. On the tank, we can make out that the month’s name is written on it, and is, in fact, Mothra.

Accidental classic

One of the most famous horror movie tropes is the slow reveal of the monster, which is teased from the beginning but we only see towards the end of the film. In Jaws, we only see the Shark only when it’s being hunted, and by that point, we’re terrified of it.

Accidental classic

While today this seems like a masterstroke by Spielberg, it was actually only done out of necessity, since the model of the Shark was malfunctioning, and couldn’t be used at the beginning of filming.

Antique shopping

Kong: Skull Island knew how to honor the original masterpiece that came before it in a pretty cool way when it actually used one of the original 1933 cameras that were used to film the original movie.

Antique shopping

In the film, as John C, Riley’s Hank Marlow is shaving, we can see the outline of the old film camera behind him. To be fair, it was a VFX composite, as confirmed by supervisor Jeff White. But it’s still cool nonetheless.

Reusing locations

We knew while we were watching Avengers: Endgame that Tony’s cabin felt familiar from somewhere, and now we know. Turns out that the same cabin was used to film in Godzilla: King of the MOnsters as well.

Reusing locations

In fact, you can actually find this very cabin on Airbnb, and rent it out for a weekend on a nice lake, if you want to. We do recommend bringing some monster repellent though if you do rent it out.

The next generation

We know that mothers and daughters often look alike, but this detail from Aliens (1986) completely caught us off guard. So, in the film, Ellen Ripley is shown a picture of Amanda, her daughter, all grown up.

The next generation

Her daughter bears striking resemblance to Sigourney Weaver, but the picture is actually a picture of Sigourney’s mother. We honestly thought it was just an edited picture of Sigourney since the resemblance between the two is just uncanny.

Venturing out there

Spielberg knows how to honor the classics, and in the case of The Lost World: Jurassic Park, he did just that. The film sees a T-Rex board a ship that takes him to San Francisco, in a scene reminiscent of King Kong being brought to New York.

Venturing out there

What makes the two even more similar is that the boat’s name in Jurassic park is S.S Venture, which is the same name as the ship that brought Kong to New York in the original King Kong film.

Design consistency

The monsters in the Godzilla Universe went through quite a bit of design changes throughout the years, so when it came time to adapt them once again for Godzilla: King of the Monsters in 2019, the filmmakers had a bunch of inspiration to draw from.

Design consistency

For the iconic King Ghidorah’s three heads, the design team actually made every head look slightly different, in a way that resembles each of the monster’s previous designs in the original Toho films.

Left for Dead

Cabin in the Woods finds brilliant ways to incorporate all kinds of classic horror movie monsters into the film, and obviously, Zombies had to play a big role in the movie. But since there have been so many different zombies in pop culture, the movie plays around with showing different versions of them. For example, a brief moment during the elevator scene has a brief appearance by the zombies from the Left 4 Dead game franchise.

Left for Dead

 

But since there have been so many different zombies in pop culture, the movie plays around with showing different versions of them. For example, a brief moment during the elevator scene has a brief appearance by the zombies from the Left 4 Dead game franchise.

The Jackson Cameo

Anybody who has ever seen any Lord of the Rings movie knows that no Peter Jackson movie is complete without a cameo by the lovable director himself. So, unsurprisingly, Jackson has a cameo in King Kong.

The Jackson Cameo

His cameo comes in the form of an airplane gunner, but not just any airplane gunner. The original King Kong also featured a cameo by the film’s director as an airplane gunner – so Jackson’s cameo is both a cameo and a reference, making it even cooler.

Shark attack

Paying attention to the fine detail can reveal many things that pay off later in the movie and can even explain key plot moments.

Shark attack

For example, at the beginning of Jaws, Brody is looking at a book that describes shark attacks and reads that they often occur due to sharks responding to ‘erratic impulses’ of fish in distress in the water. Throughout the film, the shark only attacks the boat only after the crew members fight with each other.

Concussion protocol

Cabin in the Woods is somehow both funny and terrifying, but it does manage to sneak in some surprisingly accurate medical attention to detail. In the film, after Dana crashes the RV and beats up some zombies, we can see that her pupils appear to be in different sizes.

Concussion protocol

This is actually evidence of a concussion and a common symptom of it. The pupils can later be seen going back to their original size.

The same bombs

King Kong went through a whole bunch of different interactions through the years, but one thing never changed apparently – the bombs used to take him down remained the same.

The same bombs

In the 2005 remake of King Kong, the sharp-eyed viewers will be able to notice the same gas bombs that were used in the 1933 King Kong sitting around a bunch of bottles. Those are actually props that survived from 1933, and Jackson found a nice way to incorporate them into the film.

Apex predator

Turns out that the Predators might have been around long before Arnold started kicking their behind. In the 2010 film Predators, a brief shot shows that the predator has collected Homo Erectus Skulls.

Apex predator

This means that they’ve been hunting humans for over 70 thousand years at least, since and might have been the cause for Homo Erctus’s evolution into Hmo Sapien, in order to better combat the predators. Nice little detail that adds a cool backstory to the world.

Hidden monsters

Cloverfield (2008) is jam-packed with easter eggs and references to the larger monster movie world. At the 45:30 mark, a single frame appears on the screen during an apparent glitch, which reveals this image.

Hidden monsters

This is actually a shot of The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, a monster from a 1953 monster movie. A shot from the original King Kong movie is also spliced into the film, at the 1:06:55 minute mark.

Coming full circle

In the 2012 film The Cabin In The Woods, at the beginning of the film, The Harbinger tried to warn Hadley and the rest of the gang that they shouldn’t underestimate “The Fool”.

Coming full circle

But they don’t listen, to him and are too busy laughing at the fact that he’s talking to them while on speakerphone. This however comes back to bite them at the end of the film, when “The Fool” comes back to ruin their entire operation.

Sneaky Peter Jackson

Dead Alive (1992) is one of Peter Jackson’s first films, in which a Rat-bite turns into a Zombie Apocalypse. In Jackson’s 2005 King Kong film we can see a reference to that film when a cage for Sumatran Rat Monkeys can be seen.

Sneaky Peter Jackson

We know that there are theories about how Disney or Pixar movies all exist in the same universe, but now, with this detail, we have to start thinking that about Peter Jackson’s movies as well, and it’s messing with our minds.

Flight mode activated

Gipsy Danger, the main Jaeger from 2013s Pacific Rim, is a prime example of fantastic and realistic design. The giant mech maintains real-world design principles and we can see that it actually has red and green navigational running lights on its back.

Flight mode activated

These are lights that exist on real aircraft, that help identify to other aircrafts the direction that they’re facing. Gypsy Danger, having to function with other crafts of its size, was then fitted with these lights.

Play a game

In 2020’s The Invisible Man, Director Leigh Whannell, who wrote the original Saw (2004), planted a Jigsaw reference in the film, when an image of the killer is painted on a wall that can be seen on screen for a moment.

Play a game

We know that directors like to reference themselves and their preview movies, so it’s always cool to find the easter eggs that they plant in their movies, and this cool instance is no different.

Original actors

Not every scene makes it to the final movie, and some get left out on the cutting room floor, but in the case of this scene from the 2014 Godzilla film, we think that they should have found a way to sneak it into the final fin.

Original actors

The scene sees a cameo by the original lead of the 1954 Godzilla films, Akira Takarada, as a Japanese immigration officer. He has a conversation with Ford Brody at the airport in Japan.

Time Travel stuff

In Gremlins (1984) – Spielberg and composer Jerry Goldsmith have a cameo during the convention scene. In the background, the sharp-eyed viewers will notice the original time machine from the 1960 movie The Time Machine.

Time Travel stuff

But what makes it even cooler is that in the next scene, the time machine appears to have vanished, seemingly traveled back in time. We expected nothing less from Spielberg, who’s known for his hidden inside jokes and references in his movies.